Posts tagged ‘dental decay’

The Taxing Effects of Sugar in Soda

800px-SodasRichmond, California was the first city in the state to place a soda tax on the ballot. El Monte in southern California soon followed with a similar levy. Both Measures N and H failed to pass, but voters across the country and within our practice paid close attention to the issues they raised.

Soda, juice, flavored milk, and sports drinks are the number one sources of added sugar in children’s diets today. As we move past election season, let’s revisit why sugary drinks have such taxing effects on the youngest of consumers: (more…)

December 3, 2012 at 4:29 pm 2 comments

Growing Dental Decay in Preschoolers – Stop the Cycle at Home!

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Photo: Stuart Isett for The New York Times

 

According to a recent New York Times article, dentists nationwide say they are seeing more preschoolers at all income levels with 6 to 10 cavities or more.

Catherine Saint Louis reports that one such preschooler is 2 ½-year-old Devon Koester, who recently received general anesthesia at the Center for Pediatric Dentistry in Seattle so that a pediatric dentist could treat his 11 cavities with fillings or extractions.

Devon’s extensive procedure may seem like an exception, but unfortunately, he is far from the only one. According to the many dentists and specialists interviewed by Saint Louis, dental decay among preschoolers is widespread, growing more so, and often so far evolved that administering general anesthesia seems hardly avoidable. (more…)

March 13, 2012 at 6:41 pm 2 comments

Sweet Rewards: Lollipops and Gum…Good for Teeth?

Dr. John's Candies, Herbal Lollipops

It’s possible – lollipops may be good for teeth. Sixty-six preschool students ages 2 to 5 sucked on lollipops twice a day for three weeks to show it’s so. A recent pilot study was funded by the Research and Data Institute of affiliate Delta Dental companies, and the lollipops were not your everyday lollipops. They were sugar-free and contained licorice root extract. The study’s findings, published by the European Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, showed that licorice root extract might be an ingredient to help reduce cavity-causing bacteria. (more…)

November 18, 2011 at 4:54 am 4 comments


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