Posts tagged ‘tooth fairy’

Where in Alameda Does the Tooth Fairy Shop?

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Apparently, the tooth fairy has been busy shopping in Alameda Pediatric Dentistry’s hometown. Have any of our patients noticed this sign on Pagano’s Hardware Mart on Lincoln Avenue? This local Alameda business has been around for decades, and apparently, even the tooth fairy shops here!

July 29, 2013 at 6:34 am 1 comment

Smithsonian Opens “The Tooth Fairy File”

Strange things are afoot at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History. Historians, curators, and other museum workers are so stumped they’re eliciting the help of detectives under the age of 12 to solve the mystery. Young detectives are invited to open the “The Tooth Fairy File.”

Behind the scenes, museum reports include objects being moved from storage, vaults being entered, and a tiny perpetrator, Ratoncito Perez, spotted on camera. That’s right, Ratoncito Perez, the right-hand mouse for the Tooth Fairy!

Here’s other evidence to suggest that the Tooth Fairy comes to the museum at night: (more…)

March 4, 2013 at 6:57 pm Leave a comment

Tooth Fairy Traditions

Our last post was about the big role primary teeth play in setting the stage for permanent teeth to follow. When your child is around five or six years old and those baby teeth begin to loosen, one by one, it’s an exciting part of growing up, one that sometimes comes with a hint of anxiety. The tradition of the tooth fairy helps ease some of that fear, transforming it to wonder at the winged pixie who appears in the night, donning gifts in exchange for that little piece of childhood.

Children all over the world experience the same transition, but apparently, the tooth fairy doesn’t fly the entire globe collecting teeth. In Mexico, a little mouse named El Raton swaps baby teeth for coins. The mouse is prevalent in France, Spain, and throughout Latin America, as well. Mongolian children give their teeth to a guardian angel to swallow. That guardian angel, a young dog, helps ensure that a strong tooth will grow in the lost tooth’s place.

Here are some ways to help keep the tradition’s magic alive in your home: (more…)

November 8, 2011 at 4:33 am 2 comments


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